Patient Success Story: Weight loss!

We love to share the successes that our patients have!

65 year old male has lost over 100 pounds in a year.  In addition to educating him on nutrition, we used PRP and ozone therapy to improve the health of his knees.  With the injections, he was able to be more active.  As he had less chronic pain and feel some hope, he was able to make some amazing diet changes.

A year later, his lab results have significantly improved.  He is not taking any pharmaceuticals.  He is able to walk his dog every day for over 30 minutes.  A year ago, he could not stand more than 5 minutes without 8/10 knee pain.

Congratulations!

Learn more about your allergies!

Worried About Histamine and Mast Cell Dysfunction?

If you feel like your body is constantly battling new food allergies, rashes, hives, or mysterious aches and pains, you may have a histamine disorder. We all produce histamine as part of a healthy, active immune system.

When histamines do their job correctly, they act as chemical messengers released by mast cells, which then travel to areas assaulted by allergens (like your nose filled with pollen). They tell your body to protect that tissue. Sometimes they do their job a bit too well and you end up with horrible spring allergies or even a life-threatening peanut allergy.

In the case of mastocytosis or a mast cell activation disorder, you can experience numerous symptoms due to excess histamine throughout your body. This occurs when you have an abnormally high number of mast cells, or when your mast cells are over-producing histamine. Since there are so many possible symptoms, these not-so-rare conditions are often missed.

Some common symptoms of a mast cell disorder:

-Hives, itchy skin, flushing

-Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, mouth)

-Muscle, bone or joint pain

-Fatigue, headache, dizziness, brain fog

-Cough, shortness of breath or wheezing, stuffy nose

-IBS-like symptoms, often with numerous food reactions

-Multiple chemical sensitivities

-Abnormal heart beat, blood pressure changes

No wonder this diagnosis gets missed!

If you and your doctor know what to look for, diagnosing a mast cell activation disorder is possible. Often simple blood tests are enough. The medications used to treat these conditions include mast cell stabilizers, such as cromolyn sodium or ketotifen.

Are there natural things that can help? Yes!

We recommend you always consult with your doctor before introducing a new treatment. Even if you have all the signs and symptoms, you may not actually have a mast cell activation disorder. It’s important to get a diagnosis first, and you don’t want to risk interfering with diagnostic labs.

If you do have one of these disorders, talk to your physician about:

-Food allergy and food intolerance testing

-Glutathione therapies

-Anti-inflammatory diet plans

– DAO enzyme supplements

-Quercetin and Vitamin C supplements

-Adrenal hormone support

-IV treatments like Medical Ozone and Vitamin C

It’s never too early to start a food diary and track when you experience any of your common health complaints after specific meals.

Yours in health,

Dr. Kaley Bourgeois

Luteal Phase Defect: A common hormone imbalance

Luteal Phase Defect: A Common Hormone Imbalance

Low progesterone is one of the most common hormone imbalances women face. Depending on your age, it can create different challenges.

A middle-aged woman heading toward menopause might notice heavier, painful periods and mood changes. Periods might also be more frequent, because the second half of her cycle (the luteal phase) is getting shorter. This often happens when her ovaries produce too little progesterone after ovulation, or in some cases, fail to ovulate altogether.

The same thing can happen to a younger woman, and once again the challenge may be irregular or frequent periods. She could experience worsening PMS and mood changes. The younger woman may also find becoming pregnant more challenging. Implantation (when the fertilized egg attaches itself to the uterus) usually takes place 7-10 days after ovulation. If her period comes before implantation can occur, she is unlikely to conceive.

This brings us to the under-diagnosed problem we see in so many woman:

Luteal phase defect

After ovulation, the ovary should create enough progesterone to keep the uterine lining intact for an average of 12-14 days. This allows time for a fertilized egg to attempt implantation. If your luteal phase is 9 days or less, you have a luteal phase defect.

If you’ve had trouble getting pregnant, or you noticed your periods seem to come early, it’s possible that you have a luteal phase defect. It is worth noting that not every woman ovulates on day 14, so an “early period” might be normal for some. If you ovulate on day 10, for example, and your average luteal phase is 12 days, your period could come on day 22 of your cycle. If you were to do the math assuming a day 14 ovulation, you would incorrectly think you had an 8 day luteal phase.

So how do you know if you have a luteal phase defect?

Try collecting some data! This will help you and your physician to figure out the puzzle. Pick up a few packs of ovulation test strips (just like pregnancy tests, you get to pee on a stick). After your next period ends, begin testing every morning until you get a firm positive. In most cases, you will ovulate within 24 hours. You can then record that date and keep track how many days pass until your period arrives.

You will also want to get your hormones tests. Your doctor might ask for you to come in on day 3 or day 21 of your cycle depending on which hormones they are running. At the very least, you want to get a progesterone level on day 21 (if you ovulate around day 14). If you know that you ovulate several days before cycle day 14, or several days after, your doctor can adjust when they test for the hormone.

What causes a luteal phase defect?

Sometimes a short luteal phase is simply related to peri-menopause, and it might fluctuate month to month. In other cases, you want to speak with your doctor about the following possibilities:

-Over-exercise or malabsorption

-Thyroid disease

-Adrenal fatigue

-Ovarian cyst, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

-High prolactin

-Metabolic disorder and insulin resistance

How do we treat a luteal phase defect with naturopathic medicine?

The key to regaining a normal luteal phase is understanding why it became short in the first place. This is the part where you and your physician get to be detectives. It might require a prescription, such as thyroid hormone if it turns out you have hypothyroidism. In other cases, diet and lifestyle changes may be enough.

Depending on what you and your medical team detect, effective naturopathic interventions often include:

-Diet changes and seed cycling

-Herbs such as Vitex and Black Cohosh

-Nutritional oils such as Evening Primrose, Flax or Borage

-Bio-identical progesterone therapy

-Stress reduction techniques

-Other specific nutrient therapies

Yours in health,

Dr. Kaley Bourgeois

Biofilm: Why do I keep getting a sinus infection?

Do you wonder if biofilm is affecting your health?

We have many patients who seem to continually struggle with repeated infections, chronic illness, and multiple symptoms with normal lab results.  What if it is the same sinus infection that you are simply not able to get rid of?

Biofilms can affect resistance and progression of the disease process.  Microbes can form a protective shell and often join up with other microbes.  This process can make it very challenging to improve your health.  There are 1,000’s of research articles about biofilm and how it can affect our health.  How do we address this in healthcare?

Talk to your doctor at Lake Oswego Health Center about treatment options for those seemingly recurrent infections.